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Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

 

  Image Above:  Video Still    The Birds for Mrs. Ballard  ,  2015  Single Channel Video 119 min : 18 second, looped    From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.    One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the  aesthetics of the  timecode.   Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:    LINK     

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

 

  Image Above:  Video Still    The Birds for Mrs. Ballard  ,  2015  Single Channel Video 119 min : 18 second, looped    From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.    One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the  aesthetics of the  timecode.   Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:    LINK

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

  Image Above:  Video Still    The Birds for Mrs. Ballard  ,  2015  Single Channel Video 119 min : 18 second, looped    From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.    One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the  aesthetics of the  timecode.   Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:    LINK

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

The Birds For Mrs Ballard (Edited Preview)

Above:  Edited Preview

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

 

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

 

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

Image Above:  Video Still

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

The Birds For Mrs Ballard (Edited Preview)

Above:  Edited Preview

The Birds for Mrs. Ballard2015
Single Channel Video
119 min : 18 second, looped

From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.

One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the aesthetics of the timecode.

Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:  LINK

  Image Above:  Video Still    The Birds for Mrs. Ballard  ,  2015  Single Channel Video 119 min : 18 second, looped    From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.    One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the  aesthetics of the  timecode.   Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:    LINK     
  Image Above:  Video Still    The Birds for Mrs. Ballard  ,  2015  Single Channel Video 119 min : 18 second, looped    From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.    One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the  aesthetics of the  timecode.   Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:    LINK
  Image Above:  Video Still    The Birds for Mrs. Ballard  ,  2015  Single Channel Video 119 min : 18 second, looped    From 1931 to 1932, an ethnographic survey was conducted in Marin County, California to research the language and culture of the Miwok Indians, a group indigenous to Northern California for over 5,000 years. During this survey, the last two fluent speakers of Coastal Miwok were located: Maria Copa Freas (of Nicasio) and Tom Smith (of Bodega Bay). However, it wasn't until 30 years later that the only extensive and linguistically accurate documentation of the Coastal Miwok language was conducted by a researcher from UC Berkeley named Catherine Callaghan.  In 1960, Callaghan collected thorough lexical data from Tom Smith’s daughter, Sara Ballard, in the form of field recordings.    One year after the recordings, Alfred Hitchcock purchased the rights to make “The Birds” (a short story by Rebecca Du Maurier) and selected Bodega Bay as the location for the town in the movie. This video work presents “The Birds” with only the audio/visual components of the movie for which Mrs. Ballard had English/Miwok translations. To create this work, I wrote down each word I heard from Callaghan’s field recordings and Hitchcock’s movie in order to cross-reference the recordings for accuracy and to assist with the 6,385 cuts made to the movie. The painter, On Kawara, was my inspiration for the  aesthetics of the  timecode.   Link to the Catherine A. Callaghan collection of Bodega Miwok sound recordings at the California Language Archive:    LINK
The Birds For Mrs Ballard (Edited Preview)